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NCBiotech News

  • Jim Blome has been named president, CEO and head of crop protection for the Research Triangle Park-based North American region at Bayer CropScience, to succeed the retiring Bill Buckner. More
  • The vaccine Medicago plans to produce from tobacco leaves at its new Research Triangle Park factory was safe and well tolerated in human volunteers involved in a Phase I clinical trial, the company has reported to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
  • MdxHealth, a Belgian diagnostics company with U.S. headquarters in Durham, has reported success in a Phase III clinical study identifying brain-cancer patients who are the best candidates for chemotherapy. More
  • MdxHealth, a Belgian diagnostics company with U.S. headquarters in Durham, has reported success in a Phase III clinical study identifying brain-cancer patients who are the best candidates for chemotherapy. More
  • The Fujifilm Diosynth Biotechnologies contract-manufacturing facility in Morrisville is being expanded just two months after being purchased by its new Japanese parent, FUJIFILM Corporation. The 370-employee factory, which produces ingredients used in biotechnology drugs, will expand its mammalian and insect cell-culture capabilities with a new 1,000-liter bioreactor, additional mixers and filtration equipment.
  • ASHEVILLE, N.C. June 2, 2011 – Jonathon Lawrie, Ph.D., assistant professor at the Western Carolina University College of Business’s Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, has joined the North Carolina Biotechnology Center as executive director of the Western Office. Lawrie is an educator, entrepreneur and scientist whose career has included R&D and management at major pharmaceutical companies as well as the co-founding of several biotechnology companies.
  • Former Inspire Pharmaceuticals executive vice president, CFO and treasurer Tom Staab will become CFO of  Durham’s BioCryst Pharmaceuticals on July 1, succeeding  Stuart Grant. http://investor.shareholder.com/biocryst/releasedetail.cfm?ReleaseID=580962http://investor.shareholder.com/biocryst/releasedetail.cfm?ReleaseID=580962
  • The Research Triangle Park-based Biogen Idec Foundation is once again boosting science education in North Carolina, this time giving $125,000 to three innovative programs aimed at promoting science literacy and nudging more than 2,400 students toward careers in science. Specifically, the grants to strengthen K-12 STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) education in North Carolina include:
  • POZEN, a Chapel Hill pharmaceutical firm marketing pain drugs, has been named by Comtex SmarTrend as the second-most-efficient company in the pharmaceutical industry. More
  • Syngenta announces plans to begin construction on new biotechnology research facilities in Research Triangle Park New facilities will include all-glass, climate-controlled greenhouses and precision growth chambers to study agronomic traits Construction is scheduled to begin in summer 2011
  • Growing ag biotech companies in North Carolina will soon have a new place to develop their products.
  • There's a good reason for North Carolina’s young and fast-growing global leadership in vaccine R&D and manufacturing. These billions of dollars in federal and corporate investment here, all these jobs, underscore the wisdom of the state’s long-term focus on educating and training locals who know how to work in the specialized environment of a pharmaceutical factory .
  • North Carolina's business climate has kept the Tar Heel state in the second-best ranking in the United States, according to a newly published survey of 556 CEOs conducted by Chief Executive magazine. The seventh annual "Best & Worst States" survey by the magazine showed North Carolina in the #2 spot for the third year in a row. That reflected an improvement from third place in 2008 and fourth place in 2007.
  • To most experts, it's becoming increasingly obvious that the tools of biotech must continue to be put to work in new ways if the world is to avoid future famine. One of them, Gwyn Riddick, MBA, vice president of agricultural biotechnology for the North Carolina Biotechnology Center, will moderate a panel discussion at a global forum in June on the future possibilities of agbiotech.
  • Privately held Intrexon has raised $66.9 million from 82 investors, according to a recent regulatory filing. The Blacksburg, Virginia-based development-stage biotech company entered the North Carolina biotech scene in February with the purchase of Agarigen. With Intrexon's purchase, for an undisclosed sum, Agarigen was re-christened the Intrexon AgBio Division.
  • North Carolina State University has entered into an exclusive license agreement to sell technology for producing biofuels from fats and for making various products from genetically modified marine microalgae. The deal is with Pinehurst-based Avjet Biotech, which develops small distributive refining systems.
  • Biogen Idec broke ground April 28 on Bio26, the company’s new 180,000-square-foot Research Triangle Park office building. Besides administrative offices, the five-story building will house a cafeteria, auditorium and conference rooms when it opens in late 2012.
  • A $20 million endowment has been established at Duke University’s Pratt School of Engineering to foster research collaboration between bioengineers and clinicians, with the ultimate goal to develop new technologies to improve patient care. More
  • Biogen Idec is the recipient of the 2011 Business and Industry Award in Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education for supporting NC STEM preK-12 education programs. The award is given annually to individuals and organizations to recognize their science, mathematics and technology education contributions to North Carolina. More information
  • Electric power failed around 2 p.m. today in Research Triangle Park, forcing the North Carolina Biotechnology Center to use temporary generator power as employees vacated the building. Numerous surrounding campuses were also dark, as were traffic lights.  Some Biotech Center employees who were outside the building said they'd heard at least two explosions, which sounded like power transformers failing. Utility workers said they didn't expect to have power restored until after 4 p.m.

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